Friday Free Quilt Patterns: Holly Jolly Holiday

‘Tis the season for Christmas quilting, and we’ve got a festive Friday FREE quilt pattern for you this week: Holly Jolly Holiday designed by Jereé McDade. This patchwork pattern is fast to make and perfect for using charm packs. The finished size is 48 1/2″ x 57 1/2″.

HollyJollyHolidayQuilt Friday Free Quilt Patterns: Holly Jolly Holiday

If you’d like, you could also adjust the number of squares and the border size to create a holiday tablecloth custom-fitted to your table. Or, you could use the holly and berry appliqué shapes to embellish a purchased cloth napkin or place mat. Some great tips for machine buttonhole stitching your appliqué designs are also included in the instructions!

Click here to download the Holly Jolly Holiday free quilt pattern.

HollyJolly 300 Friday Free Quilt Patterns: Holly Jolly Holiday

This Friday FREEbie is part of our Super Simple Patchwork Patterns free ebook – in addition to the Holly Jolly Holiday pattern, you’ll also get two more patchwork quilt patterns. NOTE: You will need to enter your email address at the link to get the ebook.

For more holiday quilting ideas, check out our new online course, Quilting Holiday Projects. The online course includes patterns and video tutorials for six great projects plus two bonus patterns.

Have you missed any of our previous Friday Freebies? Click here to find them all!

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Sweet April: A Visit with Marija Vujcic

Welcome guest blogger, quilt designer, and quilting teacher Marija Vujcic! Marija‘s new large throw quilt pattern, Sweet April, is in the January/February 2017 issue of McCall’s Quilting magazine. Read on and don’t miss the super prize giveaway at the bottom of the article!

Hi everyone,

My name is Marija and I am thrilled to be a guest blogger here on McCall’s Quilting blog, and share some more with you about my quilt, Sweet April, and about me.

photo1 1024x768 Sweet April: A Visit with Marija Vujcic

I have been sewing since I was ten years old, but I had never seen a quilt before I came to live in the US! I immigrated some twenty-four years ago with my husband and kids, from then war-torn Yugoslavia, for the brighter future and opportunities. Quilts are simply not a part of hand-made heritage there, but sewing clothes was a part of daily life. However, unlike garment sewists, I was always hoarding way more fabrics than I could possibly use, so there has to be some “quilting gene” in me, right?

I started quilting in 1994 when my best friend Martha showed me my first quilting book. Once I made my first quilt block, and then my first quilt (it was a Christmas quilt!), the rest was, (as we quilters know too well), history. Doodling was always my thing, but once quilts came into my life, doodling new designs, different block settings or quilting motifs became a daily routine. Pads of graph paper and colored pencils first, and now my EQ (Electric Quilt) program make ideas come to life and it was no different for Sweet April.

photo2 300x300 Sweet April: A Visit with Marija Vujcic

 

It started as an experiment to see the possibilities of the secondary pattern that classic Hourglass Blocks can make when alternated with other blocks like Nine-Patches – this was my start!

photo3 300x300 Sweet April: A Visit with Marija Vujcic

 

 

 

 

 

As I played with different colors, once this one popped-up, it somehow reminded me of rain falling on flowers… “April showers bring May flowers” came to mind!

 

 

photo4 300x300 Sweet April: A Visit with Marija Vujcic

 

 

I turned blocks on point and then it even more looked as rain falling on fresh garden blooms, so my idea was crystalized!

 

 

 

photo5 300x300 Sweet April: A Visit with Marija Vujcic

To make it even more so, I changed color of borders: top and right to blue, so it even more looks like sky and rain falling down onto flowers.

That was it! I really liked the idea of just two simple, basic quilt blocks depicting almost a nature scene (add some imagination!) and the pattern was born! It works with any blues and florals on a light background so you can make your own garden with fresh, spring rain.

For me however, this stunningly beautiful new fabric collection, Lavish, by extraordinarily talented Katarina Roccella, for Art Gallery Fabrics, is just so very perfect! The colors, the textures and yes, all gorgeous blooms… these fabrics just paint the picture! I played with so many different colorings…Light version, dark version, one floral, two florals…

photo6 300x300 Sweet April: A Visit with Marija Vujcicphoto7 300x300 Sweet April: A Visit with Marija Vujcic

And then finally, with McCalls staff, picked the final one.

sweetapril flat 500 Sweet April: A Visit with Marija Vujcic

Quilt kits and backing fabric are available!

I also had fun with playing with borders on this quilt. Breaking up wide borders with narrow strips of accent color is something I often find irresistible – it just adds a bit more pizzazz, don’t you think?

photo10 1024x1024 Sweet April: A Visit with Marija Vujcic

Do you do that sometimes?

Of course, if you do that and want mitered borders, some precision in matching all those points is required, but you know what? – it really isn’t that hard and it is so worth it! In this situation, I always sew all my border strips together into a strip set like this:

photo11 1024x768 Sweet April: A Visit with Marija Vujcic

And then miter all of them in one step.

photo12 1024x1024 Sweet April: A Visit with Marija Vujcic

Do you have a favorite method for doing this?

Once the top is done, I love to look at it for a while, to get the quilting ideas flowing. Sometimes it is quick and easy, sometimes fabric is the inspiration and sometimes, it is the whole theme, like in this case. I still went with the story of April showers bring May flowers and decided to quilt this one using free motion quilting, in a diagonal direction (like the rain falls often), making these simple water-drop motifs.

photo13 300x300 Sweet April: A Visit with Marija Vujcicphoto14 300x225 Sweet April: A Visit with Marija Vujcic\

 

 

Thanks to my youngest son’s girlfriend, lovely Leah, I even have a rare “action shot” of me quilting “Sweet April”!

photo15 1024x1024 Sweet April: A Visit with Marija Vujcic

For this I moved out of my sewing room and occupied the dining room table, since it was much bigger to support the whole quilt. It was kind of fun to be in the middle of family action too, although I am not sure if they appreciated the “intrusion”? Oh well, good that they love me, he he.

I couldn’t resist throwing in one more color accent by doing the so called “faux-piping binding” – it is really becoming my favorite binding to do! What I also love about this one is that, even though you are doing it by machine, the top stitches of the binding (on the front) are completely hidden, since they “sink” into the seam between the faux piping and binding – just perfect!

photo161 Sweet April: A Visit with Marija Vujcic

Did you try doing this type of binding already? Love it, or not so much?

Well friends, it was really such an honor to be a guest blogger here and to share some more about my quilt. I would love to hear your thoughts and opinions!

Notice how I sprinkled some questions throughout for you? Well, answer any one of them in the comments and you will be in the drawing for the little prize!! Complete instructions for making a small, wall size version of Sweet April and all the fabrics for top, backing and binding can be yours!!

photo18 300x300 Sweet April: A Visit with Marija Vujcic

Thank you so much for spending some time with me here! Come visit me on my blog too, or follow my adventures on Instagram (@mvquilts) or Facebook (Mara Quilt Designs).

I can’t wait to read your comments, have a wonderful holiday season!

Love,

Marija

Thanks, Marija! And thanks for providing this super prize! Leave a comment below before midnight December 11, 2016 and you’ll be entered into our random drawing. The winning name will be drawn on December 12 and notified by email with subject line beginning YOU WON.

This contest is open to US and Canadian residents, excluding Quebec. 

If you’d like to make a Sweet April quilt of your own, kits and backing fabric are available in our online shop while supplies last!

If you’d prefer to use your own fabric and don’t already have a copy of the January/February 2017 of McCall’s Quilting, you can order print and digital magazines in our online shop. The Sweet April quilt pattern is also available separately as an instant digital download.

 

 

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Friday Free Quilt Patterns: Peppermint Dash

Peppermint Dash quilt 600 Friday Free Quilt Patterns: Peppermint Dash

Create a happy holiday atmosphere with this week’s Friday FREE pattern: Peppermint Dash designed by Darlene Zimmerman! This red-and-white pieced Christmas quilt is quick and easy to make, and the perfect cuddle quilt for the cold winter evenings ahead.

The Churn Dash design is shown in soft flannel fabrics, but homespun checks and plaids would also make good fabric choices. The finished size of the quilt is 47″ x 55 1/2″.

Click here to download the Peppermint Dash free quilt pattern.

Peppermint Dash quilt 300 Friday Free Quilt Patterns: Peppermint Dash

This Friday FREEbie is part of our Christmas Quilt Patterns free ebook – in addition to the Peppermint Dash pattern, you’ll also get two more Christmas quilt patterns. NOTE: You will need to enter your email address at the link to get the ebook.

For more great holiday quilting ideas, check out our new online course, Quilting Holiday Projects. The online course includes patterns and video tutorials for six great projects plus two bonus patterns.

Have you missed any of our previous Friday Freebies? Click here to find them all!

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Winter Sunset: A Visit with Kate Colleran

Colleran Kate 225px Winter Sunset: A Visit with Kate ColleranWelcome back guest blogger, quilt designer, and author Kate Colleran of Seams Like a Dream Quilt Designs! Kate’s new large throw quilt pattern, Winter Sunset, is on the cover of the January/February 2017 issue of McCall’s Quilting magazine. Read on and don’t miss the fabric giveaway at the bottom of the article!

Hi everyone! I am Kate Colleran from Seams Like a Dream Quilt Designs and it is great to be back with you guest blogging for McCall’s Quilting. Today I am talking about my quilt, Winter Sunset, in the January February 2017 issue of McCall’s Quilting magazine.

When you start a new quilt project, where do you start? The pattern? The fabric? For me, every time is different. Sometimes I start with fabric that I love and work with that. Sometimes I start with the design. For my quilt, Winter Sunset, I started with the design and a general idea of color.

wintersunset 500 Winter Sunset: A Visit with Kate Colleran

But what about the quilting? To be honest, one thing that I rarely think about before I start a quilt is the quilting. I don’t know why but I usually have no idea how I am going to quilt a quilt until the top is pieced and I am standing with my friend Crystal, an amazing long arm quilter, and she asks me, “So, how do want to quilt this?”

Ummm…..

Sometimes I have a general idea if I want swirls or florals or something geometric, but sometimes I have no clue. None. So then we start looking at the quilt and we may pull an idea from the design of the quilt, or maybe look at an element in one of the fabrics and find a design that is similar.

Sometimes, we just look at designs until one says “pick me”!

Once we have the design, then we have to pick thread. Oh, the choices of thread we have to pick from- colors galore!

Do we pick a neutral thread that blends in? Do we pick a bright color that pops out and makes a statement of its own? Do we pick a solid color or a variegated thread?

threads Winter Sunset: A Visit with Kate Colleran

With so many options it can be overwhelming. For Winter Sunset, we could have picked a blue or dark grey to blend in with the darker blues in the quilt. Or we could have picked a soft blue, green or lavender.

To help us decide, we usually lay thread options out on the quilt top and see what works. And all these would work. They look pretty good. Just depends what you like.

Threads against fabric Winter Sunset: A Visit with Kate Colleran

In the end, for this quilt, we went with hot pink. Bright and bold, it really pulled all the elements of the quilt together. And we thought it was fun. Sometimes a quilter just wants to have a little fun and that is reason enough to pick a bright color!

Close up pink quilting Winter Sunset: A Visit with Kate Colleran

So, how do you pick your quilting design and thread? Do you know ahead of time what you want or wait until the the top is pieced to decide? Tell us about how you pick your quilting design and thread and be entered to win a fun 4 FQ pack of True Colors fabrics.

Kate

4FQs for giveaway 300x300 Winter Sunset: A Visit with Kate ColleranThanks, Kate! And thanks for providing this super prize! Leave a comment below before midnight November 30, 2016 and you’ll be entered into our random drawing. The winning name will be drawn on December 1 and notified by email with subject line beginning YOU WON.

 

This contest is open to US and Canadian residents, excluding Quebec. 

 

If you’d like to make a Winter Sunset quilt of your own, kits and backing fabric are available in our online shop, and they are going on sale on Cyber Monday at 30% off!

If you’d prefer to use your own fabric and don’t already have a copy of the January/February 2017 of McCall’s Quilting, you can order print and digital magazines in our online shop. The Winter Sunset quilt pattern is also available separately as an instant digital download.

CU HomeDecor 300x250 Winter Sunset: A Visit with Kate ColleranCheck out Kate’s on-demand online class, Creative Quilting for Home Decor! In addition to patterns for pillows, table quilts, and more, Kate shares tips for many quilt making techniques, including foundation (paper) piecing.

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I Love This Quilt: Twinkling Star Quilt Pattern, Part 3

“I Love This Quilt.”

Part 3: Replacing Folded-Edge Binding with Prairie Points

Twinkling Star Quilt 600 300x256 I Love This Quilt: Twinkling Star Quilt Pattern, Part 3Welcome to Part 3 of McCall’s Quilting, January/February I Love This Quilt: Twinkling Star! I’m getting closer to finishing my reproduction of this vintage quilt pattern, originally presented in the Spring 2004 McCall’s Quilting Vintage Quilts. I’m ready to prepare a Prairie Point edging.

If you are joining me for the first time, you can get the free quilt pattern download of Twinkling Star from our Quilt and Sew Shop.  Also check-out my previous blogs about the changes I’m making to the design. Click here to see Part 1, Using Triangulation method to make half-square triangles and click here to see Part 2, Changing Pattern Borders.

I’m getting close to finishing my quilt top so today I’m going to talk about the alternative I’m making to a regular folded-edge binding, adding prairie points. I’m sure just the mention of prairie points brings a big “Ugh!” to some of you. No worries. I’ve learned there are about as many methods for making prairie points, as there are types­­–some are much faster than others.

2 QuickPointRuler 300x225 I Love This Quilt: Twinkling Star Quilt Pattern, Part 3One of my work buddies handed me a Quick Points ruler when she learned I was planning prairie points for the edging of the Twinkling Stars pattern. I’m learning that this tool eliminates some of the pre-measuring and cutting, reduces the time of making prairie points considerably and helps to uniformly space the points around the edge of the quilt top, three of the biggest hassles of the dreaded prairie points.

I’m using the tool to make 2” layered prairie points on my version of the Twinkling Star pattern. Here’s a brief description of the steps I used to create the edging for my quilt. I’ll add links to a few sources for more detail at the end of this blog. You can also search for making prairie points on the web for more information about using a ruler to help you make the points.

4 PPEFabricStrip 300x225 I Love This Quilt: Twinkling Star Quilt Pattern, Part 3

Step 1-Prepare fabric.

1. I used two different fabrics to continue the interaction of cream, blue and triangles to the edge of the quilt top. I cut two lengths of each of blue and cream print fabric the width of the ruler plus ½”, and sewed them together.  You can easily add length to the prairie point strip by joining strips end to end, pressing the seams open so the points will lay flat.

 

 

2. Next, on my cutting board, I placed the ruler onto the wrong side of the fabric, lining up the center line with the horizontal seam line of the fabric strip. Holding the ruler in place, I cut into the fabric along the cut-out edges of the ruler.

5 QPRFabricPlacement 300x225 I Love This Quilt: Twinkling Star Quilt Pattern, Part 3

Step 2-Place ruler on fabric strip.

6 PPECutting 300x225 I Love This Quilt: Twinkling Star Quilt Pattern, Part 3

Step 2-Cut out Prairie Point squares.

 

3. I folded over the flaps of the blue and cream prints, one at a time, and then once more to make the prairie points, as shown in the photos below. I pressed the folded edges in place. I applied a small drop of fabric glue between the folded fabrics to hold the edges in place. (As you can see in the third photo, this method could also be used to make a really cool zigzag applique!)

7 PPEFabricFold1 300x225 I Love This Quilt: Twinkling Star Quilt Pattern, Part 3

Step 3- 1st fold, upper strip of cut squares.

8 PPEFabricFold2 225x300 I Love This Quilt: Twinkling Star Quilt Pattern, Part 3

Step 3- 2nd fold, lower strip of cut squares.

 

9 PPEFFabricFold3 300x225 I Love This Quilt: Twinkling Star Quilt Pattern, Part 3

Step 3-3rd fold, fold over triangle folds again, toward center.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4. Once a series of points were made, I folded the points in half to finish the edging strip. The prairie point strip is ready to add to the border.

10 PPEFolded 300x136 I Love This Quilt: Twinkling Star Quilt Pattern, Part 3

Step 4-Fold top points toward bottom points to complete edging strip.

5. Notice in the photo below that I pinned two prairie point strips to the right side of border, matching corner points, and the edges of the border and prairie point strip. Then, I sewed the strip to the border using a ¼” seam allowance.

11 PPESewnEdge 300x225 I Love This Quilt: Twinkling Star Quilt Pattern, Part 3

Step 6-Pin and stitch Prairie Point edging to border edge.

I turned the prairie points to the front side of the quilt top to check out how they will look on the finished quilt. Here are before-edging and after-Prairie Point-edging photos. Nice. I so Love This Quilt!

3 Twinkling Star Triangle Square Border 1 1 e1479835326716 272x300 I Love This Quilt: Twinkling Star Quilt Pattern, Part 312 PPEFinished 300x225 I Love This Quilt: Twinkling Star Quilt Pattern, Part 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I’ll be back next month to share my finished quilt. In the meantime, here are more sources about prairie points, and how to make them.

Click here for a tutorial about making prairie point edges using a traditional method: Making Prairie Points Edging.

Click here to see the Fons & Porter Prairie Points Quilting Video.

Download the free Twinkling Star pattern and join me making your own version of this vintage modern quilt. I’d love to see how you’ll make the quilt made by Alice Melum Moss in the 1930’s your very own.

Happy quilting!

 

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Hot Off The Press: McCall’s Quilting January/February 2017!

Are you ready to start planning your post-holiday quilting season? The January/February 2017 issue of McCall’s Quilting magazine is here and ready to help!

MCQ JanFeb2017e Hot Off The Press: McCalls Quilting January/February 2017!

That cover is sure to lift your spirits. Our “cover girl” quilt is Winter Sunset by Kate Colleran, and a limited number of quilt kits are available in our online shop. This pattern finishes at 74″ x 86″, and is comprised of just two block types set in straight rows. All that movement and visual excitement is generated by Kate’s clever use of value and fabric placement, not difficult piecing. This would be a perfect quilt to make just for you!

babyblooms style 600 300x300 Hot Off The Press: McCalls Quilting January/February 2017!

Baby Blooms by Emily Bailey (left) is a bit of a piecing challenge, perfect for prime quilting season between the holidays and spring. The sample quilt showcases Riley Blake fabrics from the Backyard Roses collection, so if you make this from one of our quilt kits, you can dream of the garden as you work! With a finished size of 60″ x 70″, this is a great lap or throw size quilt. Construction is fun – the blocks are like 2 diagonal snowball units, so the flowers and hanging diamonds pop out when the blocks are set together. It’s an exciting project!

sweetapril style 600 300x300 Hot Off The Press: McCalls Quilting January/February 2017!And here is Sweet April by Marija Vujcic, months ahead of when we can reasonably expect spring weather in the northern hemisphere! This 75″ square design elevates simple nine-patch and hourglass blocks to something truly unique with a diagonal setting and an unusual border treatment. Two adjoining borders feature light fabrics, and two dark, for a large-scale Attic Windows effect. Quilt kits for Sweet April are due to ship mid-December, so you may want to put this one on your Santa wish list!

And those are just 3 of the 12 exclusive new quilt designs in this magazine! Has your copy arrived yet? If you’re not a subscriber (subscribe here!), you can order the print issue or an instant download of the digital issue of this magazine.

When you complete your quilts from this issue, take some photos and share them with us on the McCall’s Quilting Facebook page. We love to see our readers’ work.

Happy quilting!

The McCall’s Quilting Staff

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Friday Free Quilt Patterns: Twinkling Star

This week’s Friday FREEbie, Twinkling Star, was selected by associate editor Tricia Patterson for our I Love This Quilt page in the Jan/Feb ’17 issue of McCall’s Quilting. The design from Jinny Beyer is a reproduction of one made by Alice Melum Moss, circa 1930.

Twinkling Star Quilt 600 Friday Free Quilt Patterns: Twinkling Star

Using lots of different fabric prints on this vintage quilt design will give you an interesting 1930s-looking quilt. You can even mix prints and plaids, or brights and pastels.

The finished size of the quilt is 66″ x 100″.

Tricia is planning on changing the design of the border and binding, and using a couple techniques to speed up the piecing, different from those probably used in the original pattern. You can follow along on her ongoing blog series about it right here on the McCall’s Quilting blog. Part one is available here, and part two is available here.

Download the Twinkling Star quilt pattern here and quilt along. It’s a Friday FREEbie!

Have you missed any of our previous Friday Freebies? Click here to find them all!

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We’ve Got a Bingo: A Visit with Jessie Kurtz

Kurtz Jessie 225px Weve Got a Bingo: A Visit with Jessie Kurtz

Welcome back guest blogger and quilt designer, Jessie Kurtz of Harding Hill Designs. Jessie’s new queen size quilt pattern, We’ve Got a Bingo, uses easy strip piecing to make a complex-looking design in no time. It’s an exciting quilt and we’re proud to feature it in the McCall’s Quick Quilts December/January 2017 issue. Don’t miss Jessie’s giveaway at the bottom of the post!

Hello! I’m glad to be guest blogging here today and excited to talk about my quilt in the December/January issue of McCall’s Quick Quilts called We’ve Got a Bingo.

bingo style 300 Weve Got a Bingo: A Visit with Jessie KurtzIf you don’t know me, I’m Jessie Kurtz, pattern designer at Harding Hill Designs. At Harding Hill Designs I strive to design patterns for ALL types of quilters.

The design for We’ve Got a Bingo started with the main block used in the quilt. As I played with the design of the block, I was excited to see the second and third patterns that were created when I played with the layout. It’s a fun treat to see those other patterns “pop out” in the full quilt.

bingo flat 500 Weve Got a Bingo: A Visit with Jessie Kurtz

The pattern uses strip sets, which makes the blocks and quilt come together quickly. Often times I’m thinking about my next project before I’m even done with my current project, so quick quilts are right up my alley!

I hope you enjoy We’ve Got a Bingo! I would love to see your finished quilts! Drop me a line at contact@hardinghilldesigns.com.

Keep going, keep sewing, keep creating and keep exploring all the amazing projects out there for quilters today.

BLOG 3980 2 Weve Got a Bingo: A Visit with Jessie KurtzNow for the giveaway! I’m giving away 3 prizes of 2 quilt patterns each. The mixture of patterns includes quilts designed for 2-1/2” strips, which make them great for precuts or to use up your scraps!

Leave a comment below before midnight November 27, 2016 and you’ll be entered into a random drawing for some of my patterns. The winning names will be drawn on November 28, 2016 and notified by email with subject line beginning YOU WON.
This contest is open to US and Canadian residents, excluding Quebec. 

Jessie

Thanks, Jessie! If you’d like to make We’ve Got a Bingo, quilt kits and backing fabric are available in our online shop! If you’d rather use your stash fabrics and don’t already have a copy of the McCall’s Quick Quilts December/January 2017 issue, you can order print and digital magazines in our online shop. The We’ve Got a Bingo quilt pattern is also available separately as an instant digital download.

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I Love This Quilt: Twinkling Star Quilt Pattern, Part 2

“I Love This Quilt.”

Twinkling Star, McCall’s Quilting January/February 2016

1A TwinklingStarQuiltStyled1 300x256 I Love This Quilt: Twinkling Star Quilt Pattern, Part 2

McCall’s Quilting Vintage Quilts, Spring 2004 Twinkling Star Quilt Pattern

A professor I had for one of my instructional design courses once told me, “You aren’t going to reinvent the wheel. It’s been done. Freewheeling is OK.” He was referring to leveraging an existing element or design to generate new ideas or ways to do something. At the McCall’s office we see many new quilt designs every day. And, most of these glorious quilts have an element of something that’s been done before, expanding upon tradition, or incorporating an element to create a contemporary design.

2 Twinkling Star Borders 293x300 I Love This Quilt: Twinkling Star Quilt Pattern, Part 2

Twinkling Star Pieced 2nd Border

I took this approach to heart when I decided to change the second border in my reproduction of Twinkling Star, a pattern originally printed in the 2004 vintage issue of McCall’s Quilting. The quilt is the I Love This Quilt feature in the January/February 2017 issue of McCall’s Quilting. You can download the Twinkling Star quilt pattern from the Quilt and Sew Shop.

The second border in the original quilt pattern was made of colorful scrappy triangles, repeating the triangles used in the blocks. I really like triangle-squares, and I like making them with the Triangulations method I used to make the Twinkling Star blocks. (See my blog posted on November 9th to learn more about Triangulations.)

I thought changing out the pieced border might give the quilt a more contemporary look so I switched out the 2nd border’s scrappy triangles for an assorted blue print and cream triangle-square border. I thought this change would enhance the transition between the borders. The pieced border in the original design gives a distinct separation between the center of the quilt and borders, a traditional design.  By adding the cream fabric into the 2nd border all three borders become part of the overall design of the quilt.

3 Twinkling Star Triangle Square Border 1  300x272 I Love This Quilt: Twinkling Star Quilt Pattern, Part 2

Tricia’s 2nd border design- Pieced triangle-squares

I know many quilters hesitate to switch out part of an established pattern. Don’t be afraid to change out quilt elements. As you know, changing accessories can give you a whole new look and feel.

Like a puzzle, incorporating a new treatment won’t fit unless it is the same size as the one you are taking out. It’s important to carefully plan ahead. Do the math before you cut and sew. Here’s one example of how to change out a border, the approach I took to calculate the second border using 2″ (finished) triangle-squares:

  1. Measure one side and the top of my quilt, after adding the first border.
  2. Divide the side measurement by the finished size by 2 to identify the number of triangle-squares needed for each side. (Example: 80″ divided by 2″ = 40. 40 x 2 sides = 80 triangle-squares.
  3. Use the same calculation to find out how many triangle-squares are needed for the top and bottom of the 2nd border. (Example: 90″ divided by 2″ = 45. 45 x 2 = 90 triangle squares.)
  4. Add 4 triangle-squares to accommodate the overlap you’ll have from the triangle-squares added to each side. (90 + 4 = a total of 94 triangle-squares.)
  • Notes: 1) Depending upon the size of the treatment you add to replace the 2nd border, you may need to adjust the size of any additional borders, or amount of binding required for the quilt. 2) If you are using the Half-Square Triangles from Squares technique found in McCall’s Quilting Quilt Basics, don’t forget to add 7/8″ to the desired finished block size.

Here are a few other possibilities of a 2nd border design for the Twinkling Star quilt pattern. Isn’t it fascinating how the change of just one element in a quilt can make it look so different?

4 Twinkling Star Alt Border 2 300x300 I Love This Quilt: Twinkling Star Quilt Pattern, Part 2

Twinkling Star pattern with basic Strip Border

5 Twinkling Star Alt Border 3 300x300 I Love This Quilt: Twinkling Star Quilt Pattern, Part 2

Another Scrappy Triangle-Square Border, using Assorted Blue Prints

6 Twinkling Star Alt Border 4 298x300 I Love This Quilt: Twinkling Star Quilt Pattern, Part 2

Twinkling Star Pieced Border – Windmill Blocks made with Triangle-Squares

Look for my blog next week to find out how I incorporated a different binding into my version of Twinkling StarDownload the pattern to make your reproduction of the original 1930s quilt made by Alice Melum Moss.

Posted in In Our Shop, McCall's Quilting Issues, Staff Quilts, Tricia Patterson, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | 4 Comments

Kansas Troubles Quilt Block – Cool Construction Trick

The Block Builders Workshop page in the January/February 2017 issue of McCall’s Quilting magazine has the coolest pattern for the classic Kansas Troubles quilt block that I’ve ever seen!

KT block Kansas Troubles Quilt Block   Cool Construction Trick

Our version of the Kansas Troubles quilt block pattern finishes at 12″ square

This classic block has quite a bit of piecing, and in traditional patterns you would need to sew large triangles and pieced triangles together along long bias edges, which can be, well, troublesome.

But our editors came up with a slick piecing trick that makes sewing on the bias unnecessary and even better, creates two of the four pieced squares for the block all in one operation. Easier AND faster – yes!

The best way to fill you in on this technique is to show you, so follow this link to Erin Russek’s short video demonstrating it. You will be AMAZED! Go ahead, it’s only 6 minutes long. I’ll wait…

See? Mind blown, right? You’re probably dying to try this technique right away! The full pattern for the block is in the magazine on page 24. If you’re considering using the same fabrics Erin did, here’s a closer look:

Untitled design 2 Kansas Troubles Quilt Block   Cool Construction Trick

The Oxford fabric collection by Quilting Treasures

Aren’t they lovely? Ask for this collection at your local quilt shop; it should be in stock now.

If you’re ready to take the trouble out of the Kansas Troubles block, try this cool piecing trick, and we’d love it if you’d post a photo of your block on the McCall’s Quilting Facebook page! A big thank you to Quilting Treasures for sponsoring this Block Builders Workshop lesson and video.

QT logo Kansas Troubles Quilt Block   Cool Construction Trick

 

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