I Love This Quilt: Twinkling Star Quilt Pattern, Part 2

“I Love This Quilt.”

Twinkling Star, McCall’s Quilting January/February 2016

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McCall’s Quilting Vintage Quilts, Spring 2004 Twinkling Star Quilt Pattern

A professor I had for one of my instructional design courses once told me, “You aren’t going to reinvent the wheel. It’s been done. Freewheeling is OK.” He was referring to leveraging an existing element or design to generate new ideas or ways to do something. At the McCall’s office we see many new quilt designs every day. And, most of these glorious quilts have an element of something that’s been done before, expanding upon tradition, or incorporating an element to create a contemporary design.

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Twinkling Star Pieced 2nd Border

I took this approach to heart when I decided to change the second border in my reproduction of Twinkling Star, a pattern originally printed in the 2004 vintage issue of McCall’s Quilting. The quilt is the I Love This Quilt feature in the January/February 2017 issue of McCall’s Quilting. You can download the Twinkling Star quilt pattern from the Quilt and Sew Shop.

The second border in the original quilt pattern was made of colorful scrappy triangles, repeating the triangles used in the blocks. I really like triangle-squares, and I like making them with the Triangulations method I used to make the Twinkling Star blocks. (See my blog posted on November 9th to learn more about Triangulations.)

I thought changing out the pieced border might give the quilt a more contemporary look so I switched out the 2nd border’s scrappy triangles for an assorted blue print and cream triangle-square border. I thought this change would enhance the transition between the borders. The pieced border in the original design gives a distinct separation between the center of the quilt and borders, a traditional design.  By adding the cream fabric into the 2nd border all three borders become part of the overall design of the quilt.

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Tricia’s 2nd border design- Pieced triangle-squares

I know many quilters hesitate to switch out part of an established pattern. Don’t be afraid to change out quilt elements. As you know, changing accessories can give you a whole new look and feel.

Like a puzzle, incorporating a new treatment won’t fit unless it is the same size as the one you are taking out. It’s important to carefully plan ahead. Do the math before you cut and sew. Here’s one example of how to change out a border, the approach I took to calculate the second border using 2″ (finished) triangle-squares:

  1. Measure one side and the top of my quilt, after adding the first border.
  2. Divide the side measurement by the finished size by 2 to identify the number of triangle-squares needed for each side. (Example: 80″ divided by 2″ = 40. 40 x 2 sides = 80 triangle-squares.
  3. Use the same calculation to find out how many triangle-squares are needed for the top and bottom of the 2nd border. (Example: 90″ divided by 2″ = 45. 45 x 2 = 90 triangle squares.)
  4. Add 4 triangle-squares to accommodate the overlap you’ll have from the triangle-squares added to each side. (90 + 4 = a total of 94 triangle-squares.)
  • Notes: 1) Depending upon the size of the treatment you add to replace the 2nd border, you may need to adjust the size of any additional borders, or amount of binding required for the quilt. 2) If you are using the Half-Square Triangles from Squares technique found in McCall’s Quilting Quilt Basics, don’t forget to add 7/8″ to the desired finished block size.

Here are a few other possibilities of a 2nd border design for the Twinkling Star quilt pattern. Isn’t it fascinating how the change of just one element in a quilt can make it look so different?

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Twinkling Star pattern with basic Strip Border

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Another Scrappy Triangle-Square Border, using Assorted Blue Prints

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Twinkling Star Pieced Border – Windmill Blocks made with Triangle-Squares

Look for my blog next week to find out how I incorporated a different binding into my version of Twinkling StarDownload the pattern to make your reproduction of the original 1930s quilt made by Alice Melum Moss.

Posted in In Our Shop, McCall's Quilting Issues, Staff Quilts, Tricia Patterson, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , | 4 Comments

Kansas Troubles Quilt Block – Cool Construction Trick

The Block Builders Workshop page in the January/February 2017 issue of McCall’s Quilting magazine has the coolest pattern for the classic Kansas Troubles quilt block that I’ve ever seen!

KT block Kansas Troubles Quilt Block   Cool Construction Trick

Our version of the Kansas Troubles quilt block pattern finishes at 12″ square

This classic block has quite a bit of piecing, and in traditional patterns you would need to sew large triangles and pieced triangles together along long bias edges, which can be, well, troublesome.

But our editors came up with a slick piecing trick that makes sewing on the bias unnecessary and even better, creates two of the four pieced squares for the block all in one operation. Easier AND faster – yes!

The best way to fill you in on this technique is to show you, so follow this link to Erin Russek’s short video demonstrating it. You will be AMAZED! Go ahead, it’s only 6 minutes long. I’ll wait…

See? Mind blown, right? You’re probably dying to try this technique right away! The full pattern for the block is in the magazine on page 24. If you’re considering using the same fabrics Erin did, here’s a closer look:

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The Oxford fabric collection by Quilting Treasures

Aren’t they lovely? Ask for this collection at your local quilt shop; it should be in stock now.

If you’re ready to take the trouble out of the Kansas Troubles block, try this cool piecing trick, and we’d love it if you’d post a photo of your block on the McCall’s Quilting Facebook page! A big thank you to Quilting Treasures for sponsoring this Block Builders Workshop lesson and video.

QT logo Kansas Troubles Quilt Block   Cool Construction Trick

 

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Corralling the PIGS — Unfinished Quilt Patterns & Projects

PIGS (Projects in Grocery Sacks), UFOs (Unfinished Objects) WIPs (Works in Progress) – it doesn’t matter what we call them, it all comes down to unfinished quilt patterns and projects. I think we all have one, or two, or maybe several haunting us. They take up room in our homes and clog up our brains. I call mine PIGS, just because I think it’s a humorous name. And I have a whole lot more than several.

For the last few years I’ve tried to complete one or more PIG every month. Some years I’ve been successful (I’m on target this year) but some years I’ve failed. I have three paper cases full of PIGS. And those are only the ones that are where they belong – there may be a few floating around my home in mysterious places. I can think of at least one that I didn’t find this weekend.

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Ready to Begin (S’more wants to help)

Recently, I’ve come to the realization that I’m not making headway in my attempt at corralling my PIGS. I have to do something different because with the sewing that I do for McCall’s Quilting, Quiltmaker and McCall’s Quick Quilts, I create at least a PIG every month which means I’m only maintaining status quo – I’m not making progress.

So, when I was asked about doing a blog series, PIGS seemed like a great subject. And it’s a good way to keep me focused and motivated to make continual progress on these quilt patterns and projects that were never finished. I think the first step to any project is to get organized. So I pulled out all three of the paper cases and piled all the contents on the floor.

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The Boxes are Empty

I made a list of everything as I went. My list was 63 items long. I actually find that embarrassing. That’s just plain crazy. Some items are orphan blocks and some projects are fairly small but some are big, big projects; entire quilts with just the patches cut.

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This is page two of my list.

I sorted through everything. I was in the perfect mood to do this, a little grumpy that I had such a huge stack of PIGS. I put things in four piles. One to keep, one to give away, one to throw away and one to “disassemble.” There were a number of kits that I decided I’d never make. I put the fabric, lace and notions from those kits away and crossed them off the list.

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Notions to Put Away

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Fabric to Put Away

Then I sorted through the “keep” pile again, separating out the orphan blocks and embroidery stitchouts.

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I have a LOT of orphan blocks.

I put the large projects, the orphan blocks and the embroidery stitchouts in one box.

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This is the first box and the only one I’ll put the lid on.

I put each small project in a separate paper lunch bag. I labeled the lunch bags. Then I put them back in the paper cases but I put the bags upright so I can peek down in the bag to see what is in it. The lids don’t go on the boxes but I think having the PIGS in view will be a good motivation for me.

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PIGS in Sacks

I rewrote my list with all the changes. I didn’t list each of the blocks separately. Now it’s only 26 items long. That’s still way too many PIGS but at least the list fits on just one page of my note pad.

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The Revised PIGS List

And at the end of the afternoon, I took one of the PIGS out and finished it. It’s this simple hot pad. I made it to show how I bind a quilt. The binding was stitched to the hot pad on three sides with all four of the mitered corners complete. All I needed to do was join the two ends of binding, finish stitching the binding to the front, press and stitch it to the back. I bet it didn’t take me more than 30 minutes. If it were to be a present for someone, I’d have done more quilting but it’s for me and it will be just fine.

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One Completed PIG

I have the second PIG on my design wall and I’m working on a plan to finish it. I’ll share more about that next time. Wouldn’t it be wonderful if I could get enough done that my PIGS all fit in just TWO boxes by the end of the year? How about you? Would you like to join me in corralling PIGS? I think this could be a lot of fun.

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Friday Free Quilt Patterns: It’s Supersheep!

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Create a cute quilt for a special baby with this week’s Friday FREE pattern: It’s Supersheep! designed by our acquisitions editor Lori Baker. Lori used fabric from Moda’s Darling Little Dickens collection and one big block to make this quick baby quilt.

The finished size of this baby quilt is 51″ x 51″.

Click here to download the free It’s Supersheep! quilt pattern.

The larger version of this quilt, Gone to Pieces, is patterned in the new January/February 2017 issue of McCall’s Quilting.

Have you missed any of our previous Friday Freebies? Click here to find them all!

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Best Day Ever: A Visit with Kathryn Simel

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Welcome guest blogger and quilt designer, Kathryn Simel. Kathryn’s new wall quilt pattern, Best Day Ever, uses easy pieced alphabet blocks to make this quilt quick to assemble. It’s a lovely design and we’re proud to feature it in the McCall’s Quick Quilts December/January 2017 issue. We’re happy to have Kathryn here to talk about her quilt!

Well hello to all Quick Quilters, it is so exciting to be this month’s guest blogger. I am Kathryn Simel, sole owner and designer of Midcoast Cottage Design. My pattern company launched in 2014 and now has 25 published patterns. After a long corporate career I relocated to the Midcoast area of Maine. The encouragement of a local shop owner and the natural beauty of the Maine coastline joined forces to launch Midcoast Cottage Design. Some of my designs have a strong coastal influence. Lobsters and buoys are plentiful!

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One of my latest designs, “Best Day Ever” was featured in the the McCall’s Quick Quilts December/January 2017 issue.

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Meet Jack, he is the inspiration behind Best Day Ever! Have ever met or lived with a Golden Retriever? Their joyful demeanor puts a smile on your face every morning.

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Jack greets the day with a roll on his back we call his happy dance and it just gets better from there. He even has his own Instagram page: Jacks_bestdayever.

There are so many occasions quilters can memorialize with a Best Day Ever quilt. I have used the wall quilt (also works as a lap quilt pattern) for birthdays, graduations, engagements, even the last day of chemo!

The letters of the Best Day Ever alphabet have been designed for flexibility. They are based on 2½” strips, which is a perfect way to use your leftover Jelly Rolls or binding strips. The entire alphabet is available online from McCall’s Quick Quilts so you can design your own saying making your quilt more personal and special.

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Fabric choices can make this quilt masculine or you can highlight a favorite color or décor style. The quilt is small enough to hang on a wall or to use as a lap quilt.

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This fall I also released Free Falling, celebrating Autumn in Maine. The pattern includes two 48″ x 48″ quilt layouts and a 16″ x 80″ table runner. I am giving away 5 copies of this pattern to get your home decorated in warm fall colors. Take a look at the pattern below and get details on how to enter the giveaway!

Wishing you the Best Day Ever!

Kathryn

Thank you, Kathryn!

Leave a comment below before midnight November 16, 2016 and you’ll be entered into a random drawing for the Free Falling free quilt pattern from Midcoast Cottage Design. The winning names will be drawn on November 17, 2016 and notified by email with subject line beginning YOU WON.
This contest is open to US and Canadian residents, excluding Quebec. 

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If you’d like to make a Best Day Ever lap or wall quilt, and don’t already have a copy of the McCall’s Quick Quilts December/January 2017 issue, you can order print and digital magazines in our online shop. The Best Day Ever quilt pattern is also available separately as an instant digital download.

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I Love This Quilt: Twinkling Star Quilt Pattern

1A TwinklingStarQuiltStyled 300x256 I Love This Quilt: Twinkling Star Quilt Pattern“I Love This Quilt.”

This sentence is so full of meaning, when you really think about it. When quilters, or non-quilters, say these words about a quilt it expresses so many things. It can be something you appreciate about the design of the quilt, the color or fabric chosen, or merely because a friend or loved one made it, or someone you don’t know made it long ago. It says something about what you favor, a sentiment or value you have.

I chose the Twinkling Star quilt pattern for the McCall’s Quilting January/February 2017 issue because I love the dynamic of pairing a color print with a neutral shade of cream. I love the pattern design because it speaks traditional and contemporary at the same time, things I embrace as a quilter–taking something from a previous generation and giving it to a new generation.

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The original Twinkling Star quilt pattern appeared in Vintage Quilts Spring 2004. The pattern is a reproduction of one made by Alice Melum Moss, circa 1930, as reported in the files of the Rocky Mountain Quilt Museum in Golden, Colorado.

As some quilters do, I decided to put my own imprint on the Twinkling Star pattern by making a few modifications to the original design. I’m going to share those with you in my blog over the next four weeks, scheduled for each Wednesday. You can download the Twinkling Star quilt pattern from our Quilt and Sew Shop.

The original pattern is a long twin size 66″ x 100″, with 15 blocks set in a 3 x 5 layout.  It’s made with assorted scrappy prints. I chose blue and cream print fabric with the Country Manor Collection by Darlene Zimmerman for Robert Kaufman. Even though I received a lot of kidding at the office about increasing the piece count to over 3,000, I decided to make my version king-size with 25 quilt blocks.

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Country Manor collection by Darlene Zimmerman for Robert Kaufman

The first border on the original quilt is pieced with a row of assorted print triangles. I’m going to add another row, using cream and blue print fabrics, to form a block pieced border of another traditional quilt block, the Pinwheel. I also plan to change the binding to a Prairie Point edging. (Yes, I am truly one for a quilting adventure–or punishment.)

I’m sharing the technique I used to make the pieced Twinkling Star quilt blocks in this blog. I’ll talk about techniques for the border treatment and decorative edging in my future blogs, before I reveal a photo of the finished quilt.

The Twinkling Star Quilt Block: Alternative Piecing Method — Triangulations

Ok, I have to admit when I calculated the amount of fabric I’d need for the changes I wanted to make to the Twinkling Star quilt I felt intimidated, and overwhelmed. I needed a bit of self-talk to build my confidence. I told myself this isn’t a turnkey quilt. I needed to consider it as a labor of love–for quilting, tradition and legacy. I decided I could do it if it meant one of my grandchildren discovered it with their parent’s belongings one day, to take it home and cherish it a little longer because Gramma Tricia made it.

When I shared my plan with a few gals at work, wondrous things happened (aside from the teasing). Denise Stark brought me a piece of paper, printed with solid and dashed lines. She handed it to me saying, this might help you speed up piecing 25 blocks. It was a printout for making 1¼” triangle-squares using the triangulation method. (Another co-worker suggested a ruler to help with the prairie point edging. I’ll share that in a later blog.) You can download a plethora of sizes of triangulation template patterns online. Enter the search term “triangulations template quilt pattern.”

How to Triangulate

Each 1¼” triangulation template makes 24 triangle-squares. I copied the template onto transparent vellum paper. I placed the template, print-side up on two pieces of different print fabrics of the same size, facing the right sides of fabric together.

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Starting at one corner of the page, I followed the arrows to stitch on the dotted lines around each of the squares on the template. Then, I used my rotary cutter to cut along the solid lines to create 24 triangle-squares.

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Twinkling Star Quilt Block

Each Twinkling Star block contains 12 pieced squares. Each pieced square contains 3 triangle-squares. It takes 36 triangle-squares for each block, a total of 900 triangle-squares to make 25 blocks. I need to make 38 triangulation pages to complete the center of the quilt.

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Yep, I’m still feeling overwhelmed. My mantra is, “I love this quilt. I love this quilt. I’m a quilter, and this is what we do. It’s going to be one of the best quilts I’ve made!”  I hope you continue to join me as I make my Twinkling Star quilt top over the next few weeks. Download the quilt pattern! Quilt along!

~ Tricia Patterson
Associate Editor, McCall’s Quilting

Posted in McCall's Quilting Issues, Tricia Patterson | Tagged , , | 8 Comments

Bonnie Hunter’s Wanderlust Course – a Scrap Quilt Pattern Extraordinaire

Have you registered for my Wanderlust Quilt with Bonnie Hunter (Scrap Quilting Basics from Beginning to Binding!) course with Craft U yet?? This is the perfect way to learn techniques, tips and tricks for your scrap quilt patterns and to sew along with me as we work on the Wanderlust quilt.

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EssentialTriangleTool 231x300 Bonnie Hunters Wanderlust Course   a Scrap Quilt Pattern ExtraordinaireSince we will be using my new Essential Triangle Tool for this year’s Quiltville mystery, having the workshop in your Craft U library for easy access would be just the ticket for watching when you want, refreshing techniques when you need them, and honing up some skills. Craft U has now gone ALL STREAMING, so wherever you have an internet connection you can access my courses. They are yours to stream as often as you wish and you get interaction through the message boards, sharing with other students for one year from purchase!

PERFECT!

Not only will you learn to use the ruler and various techniques, you’ll also have the instruction for making Wanderlust from my new Addicted to Scraps book (because scrappy quilt patterns are quite addicting!).

Many of these same techniques and more MAY be used in one way or another during our mystery – you’ll be ready!

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Course Description:

In this online course, world class scrap quilter and scrap quilt pattern designer, Bonnie Hunter, takes you step-by-step through the process of creating her Wanderlust quilt. Scrappy Stars explode with color and come together easily in a variety of methods for simple unit construction.

Wanderlust Quilt Bonnie Hunters Wanderlust Course   a Scrap Quilt Pattern Extraordinaire

Wanderlust Quilt by Bonnie Hunter

Learn a variety of techniques and applications for making Flying Geese and half-square triangles in multiple sizes and watch them come together in the stunning Wanderlust Quilt, all from your scrap stash!

Bonnie will share her new Essential Triangle Tool and Bonus Buddy ruler. She will share her techniques for using these rulers and show you how these tools can help make your scrap quilting a complete joy!

The digital Wanderlust scrap quilt pattern (Quiltmaker Magazine Edition) will be included in the course—a $7.99 value.

Also with enrollment: the Wanderlust FREE table runner pattern simple digital download!

table runner Bonnie Hunters Wanderlust Course   a Scrap Quilt Pattern Extraordinaire

FREE Wanderlust table runner pattern with enrollment!

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Here are some fun photos from the online course taping….

On the set in Golden, Colorado, Essential Triangle Tool in hand!

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On set in the Golden, CO video studio

Filming this course was so much fun!

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Filming in the Golden, CO video studio

And we used the Essential Triangle Tool for all of these units!

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Essential Triangle Tool — very handy!

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Here’s the gist of why I think this course is important:  Camera angles, close ups, repetition! These are things you can’t get during Quilt-Cam.

Who Should Take this Course:

  • A beginning quilter who wants to learn tips and techniques that will make your quilting experience successful
  • Intermediate to advanced students who wish to refresh or supplement their skills.
  • Advanced Students who want to discover how quick it is to work with specialty rulers

Lesson 1: Wanderlust Overview

  • Wanderlust Quilt introduction and break down of units.
  • Making Flying Geese with stitch & flip corners.
  • Making Flying Geese with the Essential Triangle Tool.
  • Assembling small inner star & half inner star.
  • Making half-square triangles with the Essential Triangle Tool.
  • Sewing large Flying Geese (two types) with Stitch & Flip method or Essential Triangle Tool.
  • Block layout and assembly with connecting corner demonstration. Full block & half block.
  • Half-square triangles, small and large joined to border units.
  • Joining border units and adding inner border.
  • Quilt finishing and quilter showcase.

half square triangles Bonnie Hunters Wanderlust Course   a Scrap Quilt Pattern Extraordinaire

Lesson 2: Half-Square Triangles; Block Assembly.

  • Making half-square triangles with the Essential Triangle Tool.
  • Sewing large Flying Geese (two types) with Stitch & Flip method or Essential Triangle Tool.
  • Block Layout and Assembly with connecting corner demonstration. Full block & half block.

border blocks Bonnie Hunters Wanderlust Course   a Scrap Quilt Pattern Extraordinaire

Lesson 3: Border Blocks, Quilt Assembly and Binding

  • Half-square triangles, small and large joined to border units.
  • Joining border units and adding inner border.
  • Machine & hand stitched binding
  • Making a hanging sleeve

Lesson 4: Quilter Showcase

  • I share the quilts from the Addicted to Scraps book, focusing on those that ALSO benefit from the use of the Essential Triangle Tool!

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I hope you’ll join me in this course!

I’ve got a coupon code for you! Save 15% by using the code WANDER15.

Register today at Craft U: Wanderlust Quilt with Bonnie Hunter (Scrap Quilting Basics from Beginning to Binding!)

Looking forward to discussing with you!
~Bonnie

 

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Friday Free Quilt Patterns: In a Snap

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Looking for a quick quilt top you can easily complete in a weekend of stitching fun? This week’s Friday FREE pattern is just the ticket! Designed by Susan Guzman, this adorable lap quilt is named In a Snap! because that’s just how quickly you can stitch it together.

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Susan used fabrics designed by Sandy Klop of American Jane for Moda on the quilt. Whether you make this quilt from precut fabric packs as Susan did, or search out the perfect combination of scrap fabrics from your stash, this design is sure to delight.

The finished size is 60 1/2″ x 60 1/2″.

Click here to download the free In a Snap! quilt pattern.

This Friday FREEbie is a web extra for our January/February 2017 issue of McCall’s Quilting. Be sure to check out the new issue for more stash-busting projects!

Have you missed any of our previous Friday Freebies? Click here to find them all!

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Bow Tie Wreath: A Visit with Abigail Dolinger

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Welcome guest blogger and quilt designer, Abigail Dolinger. Aby’s new quilt pattern, Bow Tie Wreath, uses large quilt blocks and quick piecing techniques for the 9-Patch units in the quilt blocks. It’s a lovely design that comes together quickly! You’ll find this quilt in the McCall’s Quick Quilts December/January 2017 issue. We’re happy to have Aby here to talk about her quilt!

Hello, blog readers, I’m excited to share my inspiration for Bow Tie Wreath! Since comparable fabrics should be easy to find, and the patchwork is not complicated, I hope you’ll be motivated to make a similar wall hanging quilt for the holiday season.

Years ago I made a simple wall quilt with four Bow Tie quilt blocks, three solid green and one solid red, arranged in a circle. By turning the block on-point and adding four setting triangles of background fabric, the block became a wreath. I quilted it, framed it in a wooden circular hoop, and gave it to my in-laws as a gift.

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In making this new quilt, I expanded the single Bow Tie wreath idea by asking several questions.

What if I replaced the solid red and green with print fabrics?
What if I used two light background fabrics, one white and the other light tan?
What if I increased the quilt’s size by making nine quilt blocks?
What if I connected the nine blocks with diagonal elements?

The first step in researching the answers to my questions necessitated a trip to my local quilt shop. There, I found: red and green tone-on-tones and a holly print for the Bow Ties, snowflake white-on-white and tan evergreen needle print for background, and a fabulous, showy poinsettia print for the border.

I used Electric Quilt computer software to draw the block, arranging tiny squares diagonally in the corners. An advantage of Electric Quilt is its feature to create printable templates with seam allowances added. After measuring the templates, I converted my construction techniques to rotary cutting and strip piecing. I wrote basic measurement and sewing instructions as I made the blocks. Arranging the nine finished quilt blocks on a design wall was so rewarding! I had answers to the “what if” questions, and the result was absolutely pleasing!

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By making some changes to an old Bow Tie wreath idea, I arrived at a modernized quilt which is the product of delightful print fabrics, rotary cutting and strip-piecing techniques, as well as a visually interesting diagonal element.

Now I wonder …? What if …? Perhaps you have some ideas for changing Bow Tie Wreath. Leave your thoughts in the comment section below.

Thank you, Aby!

If you’d like to make a Bow Tie Wreath wall quilt and don’t already have a copy of the McCall’s Quick Quilts December/January 2017 issue, you can order print and digital magazines in our online shop. The Bow Tie Wreath quilt pattern is also available separately as an instant digital download.

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6 Hacks For Getting the Most Out of the EXPO Experience

161026 osqe quiltheader 6 Hacks For Getting the Most Out of the EXPO Experience

Original Sewing & Quilt EXPO’s next stop will be at the DoubleTree Bloomington in Minneapolis, MN, in just a few days – Nov. 10, 11 and 12. A general admission ticket will get you in the door, and lead you to all of the EXPO excitement — shopping, stage presentations, fashion shows, quilt displays and more — and there are dozens of great classes you can register for, too. Whether this is your first EXPO or your 20th, here are a few helpful hacks you should know for getting the absolute most out of your Minneapolis EXPO experience:

161029 osqe stage 6 Hacks For Getting the Most Out of the EXPO Experience

Plan your schedule around the EXPO Stage.

Check out the EXPO stage schedule and plan your day around those “free with admission” classes and presentations. Diane Tomlinson, Cynthia Guffey, Linda Lee and Cindy Losekamp are just a few of the big names who will be taking the stage. You’ll find renewed energy, inspiration and lots of how-to advice from these lively 30-minute sessions. Learn more.


161026 osqe shop 6 Hacks For Getting the Most Out of the EXPO Experience

Arrive early to shop.

The EXPO hall opens at 9:30 a.m. in Minneapolis, which is 30 minutes before the first class lets out. That means the early bird will get the worm because you’ll get in to shop before the big crowds come in! The hall will be filled with an incredible selection of machines, tools, notions, patterns, fabric and all the experts to help you get everything you need. Learn more.


161026 osqe demo 6 Hacks For Getting the Most Out of the EXPO Experience

Check out “The Spot.”

While you’re in the EXPO hall, be sure to check out “The Spot” — this more intimate demonstration area will include more “free with admission” classes, trunk shows and presentations. Learn more.


161026 osqe value 6 Hacks For Getting the Most Out of the EXPO Experience

Pre-register and save with value package pricing.

Classes at the EXPO are $19 per session, but you can pre-register for a value package and save! Value packages include some great perks too: FREE general admission and a FREE shopping bag. Learn more.


161026 osqe friend 6 Hacks For Getting the Most Out of the EXPO Experience

Carpool with friends and save.

The “Driver Gets In Free” promotion is one of the EXPO’s best hacks. It lets YOU enjoy free general admission when you bring two friends (who purchase admission) with you in your car. It’s more fun, and the environment will be better for it. Learn more.


161029 osqe friends 6 Hacks For Getting the Most Out of the EXPO Experience

Bring a friend to class, and you’ll both get a free class ticket.

Have a dear sewing friend or quilt guild pal who you just know would love the EXPO? Introduce them to classes at the EXPO, and you can both get one free class ticket. All you have to do is both pre-register for at least one class, then follow the easy steps for our Bring-a-Friend program. Learn more.

Click here to visit the Minneapolis Original Sewing & Quilt Expo site and plan your trip!

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