PIGS: A PIG for All Seasons

With one PIGS (Projects in Grocery Sacks) finish for May under my belt and a weekend looming, I decided to see if I could get another project well under way.

I went through my PIGS on Wednesday and decided to see if I could make a quick and easy quilt from some batiks that I’d tested thread on a couple of years ago. I had used lots of different colors, weights, types and brands of thread. I’d stitched a row of straight stitches, a row of decorative stitches and then did a band of free-motion meandering. I had 30 pieces; some had batting and some were just a single layer of fabric. Some of the pieces were squarish; some were rectangles.

I found two embroidered squares and two crazy quilt blocks that seemed to fit in the mix of batiks.

Because this is supposed to be a quick project, on Thursday, I cut all the samples to 8½” squares. I could have played around with the different sizes but that would have taken a lot more time.

back or front 300x225 PIGS: A PIG for All Seasons

Quilt back

I had another thing in my PIGS, a 100”-wide piece of white cotton with quilting lines printed on it. I decided I could use it for the back of my quilt.

I’ll have to be very, very careful that I don’t get any tucks when I’m quilting because I’ll be quilting from the back with the quilt top on the bottom of my quilt sandwich.

 PIGS: A PIG for All Seasons

501 Quilting Motifs

In case you don’t have a piece of fabric like mine, Quiltmaker’s 501 Quilting Motifs has lots of designs to choose from. It’s available digitally or in print form at QuiltandSewShop.com.

I placed the thread testing samples on my design wall and was pretty disappointed that there were only 30. They were taking up so much room in my PIGS boxes that I thought there were more.

By my calculation, I needed 114 more squares to make the quilt. And again, it’s supposed to be quick and easy. I’m hoping the quilting can be the star of this particular quilt so I decided to just cut batik squares. I don’t intend to do anything to fancy them up — no embroidery, no decorative stitching, nothing.

So as I prepared to go to work on Friday, I grabbed a whole stack of fabric from the batiks section of my Fabric Inventory.  I tried to get a mix of light and dark fabrics. And I brought one big piece of bright blue to use as the focus fabric.

After lunch (at 1:25 to be precise), I went to the studio and started pressing my fabric.

I got out the AccuQuilt Go! and the die to cut 8½” squares and got busy. At 2:45 I had all my squares cut and everything put back away. I thought that was pretty good to set everything up, press the fabric, cut the squares and put everything away again in only an hour and 20 minutes. I could hardly wait to go home.

That evening, I placed the squares on my design wall and tried to get a nice balance of colors and of light and dark.

design wall1 300x289 PIGS: A PIG for All Seasons

The Quilt Top Is Done

Stitching the squares together was quick and easy. They were all exactly the same size, thanks to cutting them with the AccuQuilt.

The top is all stitched together. I tried to pin baste but got a big fold in the quilt top. I unpinned everything and brought the three layers to work. I am going to load them on the Grace quilting frame and then with the Grace Q’nique longarm quilting machine, I’m going to baste the layers together. Then I can take it back home and quilt it on my domestic machine to take advantage of the quilting design that is on the fabric I am using for the quilt back.

But for now, it’s just sitting in my office — a PIG once again.
Happy quilting.

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One Response to PIGS: A PIG for All Seasons

  1. Ruth Gawlikoski says:

    Lori: I really enjoy reading about your PIGS. Here of course we call them UFO’s and in truth I do not have as many as you . However, I made your OOH-Rah blocks in 2014 (but in brown’s tan’s and cream’s) and I now have it finished except for the binding (this afternoon maybe?) It ended up being a tied quilt (I can only manage about one hand quilted quilt each year and at 2 cents per square inch I cannot afford a long arm quilter).
    Anyway, it is quite striking and I thank you for the experience. Ruth

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